Health risks and vaccinations in Senegal

What are the health risks in Senegal? Here is some information on the key risks and dietary precautions to take when visiting or living in Senegal.

Peace of mind when visiting or living in Senegal

 
 Major health risks in Senegal
Senegal has a number of health risks which should not be overlooked and you should take protective measures before leaving home:
Beware of mosquitoes that can transmit:
- malaria: cases are recorded throughout the country, especially in humid regions, so it is strongly recommended to use mosquito nets and repellent.
Be vigilant with regard to a number of persistent diseases in Senegal:
- meningococcal meningitis: from the month of March, this disease appears mainly in the eastern regions of the country;
- tuberculosis
- rabies: watch out for stray animals.
-  STDs and AIDS: safe sex should be practised by the use of condoms, while needles and other medical equipment should be sterile.
 
Food risks in Senegal
 
It is advisable to be careful with regard to hygiene in Senegal, in particular:
- Do not drink tap water and avoid any water-based products (ice creams, sorbets, ice cubes) if you cannot be sure that they are made with mineral water.
- Avoid undercooked or uncooked foods, especially meat or fish.
- Take anti-diarrhoea medication with you.
- Remember basic hygiene rules (wash your hands before meals) which can help you avoid diarrhoea or the dreaded “turista”. Although this disease is not serious, it can be very troublesome or get worse if not treated properly.
 

Vaccinations required in Senegal

 
What vaccinations are required before travelling to Senegal?
These are the recommended vaccinations for travel to Senegal.
 
Protection against disease
 
In addition to the compulsory vaccinations in France, only a certified vaccination against yellow fever is required.
These vaccinations are recommended but optional:
- typhoid
- malaria
- rabies: for extended stays in remote areas.
- the recommended malaria chemoprophylaxis 
- meningococcal meningitis
Date of publication Jun 7 2012